While studying abroad can be scary, some things should come easy

A person can’t easily overcome their fears of leaving home, and/or the feeling of missing their own bed, but they can mitigate a substantial amount of fear of the unknown. 

Your bags are packed, loaded into the car, and you’re just gathering up and inventorying the rest of your things. Passport, check. International license, check. Pocket translator, check. You jump into the car, and off you go, heading to the airport to board a plane, which will take you to your first experience away from home, and in a foreign country at that. Mom is nervous, dad is nervous, but neither of them quite as nervous as you, the one who in a matter of hours will be completely out of your element. It’s an adventurous feeling for many, yet statistics show that for many more, study abroad programs are nerve wracking for students. Fears range from language barriers and homesickness, to what to do if they become sick and how will they get around.

There are many variables that can stress out a student who is traveling abroad for a semester, but some things really should just come easy. When the decision to go to a foreign country for school is made, it is made based on the hope and assumption that the experience will be a rewarding and adventurous one, where the student can meet new people, add to their academic progression, experience a new culture, try a different cuisine, and show all of their friends back home what a fantastic time they are having while away; something that will make those friends both envious and in aw. Yet, underneath it all, sometimes the level of comfort really is not fully present, as certainty and self-confidence wane from within.

alone bookshelves casual guy
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Leaving home for any extended period of time while young can be a frightening thing; we all know that. But while there are some things that remain uncertain–and will be scary to a young traveler–preparedness at its best will help to set a limit on those fears. In an attempt to create a service that allows all travelers to plan their travel like a professional, Planiversity.com is thinking ahead, and soon we may be developing an option for creating a student account, in addition to both individual or business.

“There are many variables that can stress out a student who is traveling abroad for a semester, but some things really should just come easy.”

At present, the service does well to organize documentation, while providing users the option to create a schedule, add notes, and something very relevant to the student, we enable filters into the trip packet, allowing them to pinpoint a destination in their travel, and locate resources within whatever proximity they set around it. For example, users can set their location, and know where hospitals, police stations, hotels, service stations, and even their embassy is, within that chosen radius. All of this, combined with the option to include maps, driving directions, arrival weather, and receive a U.S. State Department travel advisory makes this service ideal for the first time traveler. A person can’t easily overcome their fears of leaving home, and/or the feeling of missing their own bed, but they can mitigate a substantial amount of fear of the unknown.

Planiversity isn’t just a service designed for travel agencies and event planners; it’s a travel software that can benefit all who are serious about planning. We may be a master itinerary service, but we’d rather see ourselves as a service providing a much needed and highly relevant tool for anyone on the go; no matter how far, no matter how long.

http://www.planiversity.com

Author: Erich @ Planiversity

A pragmatic individual at core, I try to remain as grounded as possible in all things. Once a foot soldier, evolved into an aviator in the military, I've since transitioned into an individual of several hats; that of Corporate Director, Writer, and eager Entrepreneur. Travel has been a large part of my life and without the experiences that I've had in far away places, I would likely see things with a more limited view. Experience is everything in life, it brings context and perspective to all things, be it work, relationships, or setbacks. I consider myself very fortunate to have been able to see the things that I have and learn about cultures that I could. It's my goal to offer my experience to those ears willing to listen and the eyes kind enough to take a read. Find me on LinkedIn

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